Author: Rob Miklas

At Quality Incentive Company, Rob is responsible for leading the company’s business development efforts in both the employee recognition and sales/channel arenas. He has more than 10 years of experience in the recognition and incentive industry, having served as president and CEO of Atlanta-based Loyaltyworks before joining QIC in 2011.

Got 5?

5 Elements of Customer Loyalty ProgramsAs frequent readers of our Blog will recognize, I am a big proponent of applying consumer loyalty program precepts in the B2B setting. Today, I draw your attention to a news item from the fine publication ColloquyWant a rewards program that benefits both brand and customer? Incorporate these 5 elements., written by Kristen Burkard. In this article, the author outlines in very clear and direct language many of the points that we stress to our existing and potential clients. Three of those five points are worth highlighting here.

The first is that it is essential to uniquely and powerfully brand your rewards program. While the focus of the article is on purchase frequency programs, we believe that program branding is critical for recognition programs as well. A unifying program name, logo and point currency all reinforce the program’s identity for participants and provide a common basis for communications.

The next element refers to exclusivity, which the author defines in terms of shopping behaviors. I think that her definition is well-grounded, but I submit that the term “tier identification” might be more descriptive. Regardless of definition, this element involves the classification of participants into groups based on their buying activities, and then rewarding those in higher tiers with bonus points and/or higher award rules. Here at QIC, we have seen this practice applied to great success. In fact, many of our larger programs provide participants with the opportunity to earn “Premier” status, which, upon attainment, entitles them to a 25% multiplier on all point awards.

The final point to highlight is the importance of the program’s mobile presence. The author cites the need for the program’s mobile version to be “easily accessible and visually appealing.” We totally agree. And it’s important to note that we employ a responsive design approach to our program web sites, so that the critical branding elements unique to your program prevail in the mobile version.

So, we suggest that you look at your current – or planned – program, to see how it fares against the five elements outlined in the article. Following that, we invite you to contact us to help with any of those elements that you find need to be reinforced.

Questions of Engagement

I just finished reading the excellent blog post by my colleague, Jeff Edwards, entitled Engagement by the Numbers . If you haven’t read it yet, I highly recommend it to you. But my purpose in writing today is not only to give Jeff a shout-out, but to offer some thoughts of my own on the… Read more »

Gamification – Of Leaderboards and Checkers Boards

As I’m sure that our readers know, gamification is a pretty hot topic these days. However, what our readers may not know, or may not have thought much about, is that there can be confusion in the marketplace about the relationship between gamification and interactive games – especially games of chance. Here at QIC, we’ve… Read more »

Make No Mistake – Valuable Program Advice

I’ll open today’s post with a confession. While I regularly read and digest materials from industry publications, I don’t necessarily do so in a timely fashion. So, I hope that you’ll excuse me as I reference an article that appeared in the MarketingProfs newsletter several months ago. This article, Seven Common Mistakes Marketers Make ,… Read more »